International Transgender Day of Visibility

March 31st, 2016 was celebrated as International Transgender Day of Visibility (TDOV). TransWave is committed to promoting transgender health and well-being and as such a TDOV campaign was undertaken to highlight and celebrate the struggle, the acceptance, the journey and the successes of transgender people in Jamaica.

In case you missed the video campaign on our Facebook Page, watch them here!

Keyanna shares her thoughts on visibility and her vision for transgender women in Jamaica.

 

Renee reflects on the meaning of visibility and it’s importance to her

 

Mindy discusses the impact ‪#‎TDOV‬ has on her life.

 

 

Neish shares what ‪#‎TDOV‬ means for him and his hope for Jamaica

 

In addition to the videos, there was a photo campaign that also included other Jamaican transgender men and women. Here are the image along with quotes from our inspirational transgender men and women.

 

Sean TDOV
Sean-Claude

 

 

“My name is Sean-Claude Neufville. I’m 29 years old. I’m a motivational speaker and a future psychologist and a proud Jamaican transman. I live in The Netherland where I will be doing my transition. It is my dream to inspire other transmen in Jamaica and the wider Caribbean to live in their truth by sharing my journey.”

 

 

 

 

Kyym.jpg
Kyym

 

“Hi! I’m Kyym! I’m a transgender woman. I love everything about me. I love who and what I’ve become. I wouldn’t trade the pain for anything in this world, as it is the foundation of the strength I never knew I had. There’s something special about me. People will never be able to get the best of me.”

 

 

 

Ashley
Ashley

 

 

“I’m Ashley. I’m fun. Brave. Loving. A fashionista.A blogger and I’m a Jamaican transwoman”

 

 

 

 

FJ5
FJ

“Hi. I’m FJ. Being visible is a powerful and complex act. It is a demonstration of leadership, an act of defiance, but perhaps most importantly, it is an act of affirmation and strength, embracing the totality of who you are and standing in your truth”

Jessica TDOV.jpg
Jessica

 

 

“I am Jessica Burton – a proud woman who supports my fellow Jamaican trans community with one love, one heart”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

While we celebrate and applaud the visibility of our transgender community, we also reflect on those who are not able to make that step. We celebrate ALL transgender people regardless of their visibility. We hope that the visibility of some gives other transgender people comfort in knowing that the community is here.

Visibility does not end on International Transgender Day of Visibility. Through continued advocacy, it is our hope to enlighten and educate Jamaicans in order to reduce stigma and discrimination faced by transgender people as well as to increase access to services so that the lives of transgender Jamaicans can be improved.

 

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Trans Profile – Ashley

We have a chat with Ashley. Jamaican. Transgender woman. Fashionista

Hi Ashley can you tell us a little about yourself? 

Here are 5 words that best describe who I am: Brave. Positive. Fashionista. Fun. Loving

How did you identify in your childhood/teenage years and what were some of the challenges you faced with your gender identity throughout your youth?

As a child growing up I always felt like a girl. I was always uncomfortable to do boy stuff but as I grow older I realize I am definitely a girl on the inside. Everything I do is natural. I was born this way. 

How has your identity, sexual orientation and gender expression changed or progressed through your adult-life?

Nothing much has changed as it relates to my gender identity and sexual orientation. I am more confident within myself and the decisions I made are truly how I feel in my heart. 

What is it like to identify as a transgender woman, living and working in Jamaica? What are some of the challenges you face?

 It’s very difficult because contrary to popular belief, trans women are not sex objects and prostitutes. This is not true. The opportunities are very limited. This is my life and I’m 100% responsible for every decision I make so I have to do whatever it takes to survive without selling my body. No judgment to those who choose that path though.

Tell us about your blog and your professional journey? (Check out her blog here)

I’ve always loveeeeeed fashion and dressing up growing up and because I never got to graduate from high school to become an accountant as planned. My love for fashion never dies so I decided to start a fashion blog in late 2011. With me being consistent with my blog it has given me alottt of opportunities some of which I capitalize from. I just want to keep on striving and dream big no matter what challenges or obstacles I may face ahead in life. 

Do you have a support network? What are some of the resources that help you navigate life in Jamaica as a transgender woman?

 My ONLY support is me, myself and God. No one gives me anything. Everything I achieve thus far is me believing in myself and go out there and making a way. 

What are some of the changes you wish to see regarding the accessibility to healthcare for transgender men and women in Jamaica and the wider Caribbean?

One of the most important changes is I would love to see is for trans women to be able to get hormone treatment here because as it is right now I don’t know of anyone or doctor that does that kind a treatments in Jamaica. 

Do you face any other challenges you wish to discuss further?

I don’t really face any other challenges and I’m thankful. I get criticism everyday when I’m going about my daily business. It’s my normal now because I’m grown and I have a strong unaffected spirit. 

What advice would you give to transgender men and women living Jamaica and the wider Caribbean?

Stay in school. Get an education. Believe in yourself. Don’t worry too much over people’s words. It’s powerless and does not matter. 

 

The Visibility Campaign

Four beautiful people came together to lend themselves to a campaign which aimed to promote transgender and gender non-comforming visibility. It was a collaborative effort with J-FLAG, who funded the event, and TransWave.

The campaign was launched during Transgender Awareness Week (#TransWk) which was recognized from November 14-20, 2015.

The kick off for the campaign was a Trans Gallery display at PRISM, a social and cultural event hosted by J-FLAG for the LGBT community, on November 15th. With over 300 persons in attendance, PRISM presented the opportunity for the community to get its first look at the campaign while the talents were on hand to answer questions and give feedback. One highlight of the event was the opportunity to address the audience, introduce the talents and speak a little about the diversity within the transgender and gender non-conforming community.

Trans Gallery
Trans Gallery viewing

After PRISM and the resulting buzz, the campaign hit social media. TransWave featured one person from the campaign each day (Monday to Thursday) and highlighted the group shot in honour of Transgender Day of Remembrance on Friday.

Here are some of the feedback from social media:

IMG_20151121_151858 IMG_20151121_151830 IMG_20151121_151638 IMG_20151121_151728 IMG_20151121_151929 IMG_20151121_161929

We are heartened by the support we received. TransWave is committed to highlighting the needs of the community, creating spaces to share, engage in conversations, and mobilise to improve the health and well-being of the community.

We’d also like to thank Dexter Pottinger for his styling expertise; Lance for the great shots; and Madeline, from Quick Fyah Marketing, for the campaign edited shots.